There’s No Sound In My Head

There’s No Sound in My Head
(20 minutes) USA

Composer Mark Applebaum’s cryptic, painfully fastidious, wildly elaborate, and unreasonably behemoth pictographic score “The Metaphysics of Notation” consists of seventy linear feet of highly detailed, hand-drawn glyphs, two hanging mobiles, and absolutely no written or verbal instructions. Installed for one year at the Cantor Arts Center Museum on the Stanford University campus it received forty-five weekly performances from interpreters from around the world. There’s No Sound in My Head investigates the project and Applebaum’s development as a composer. Through interviews with composers and musicologists, performance footage, and conversations with Applebaum as he draws in his studio, the film poses questions about the borders between music and visual art.

Peaches Does Herself

P.H.D

Critics have described the movie as “a ‘Pina’ for the queer and sexually liberated crowd” while Peaches herself likes to describe it as “The Jukebox Musical that got a Sex Change”!

An autobiographical electro-rock-opera with an air of Tron but loads of dicks and pussies. A species of “anti-jukebox musical”, in which the Canadian artist unleashes her vision of the world based on contagious beats and hermaphrodite dancers. Food for thought # and more…

sempre viva

marria callas

When Maria was leaving Christina to sing at Covent Garden in London, where people had slept outside for five nights to get tickets, as she was leaving the Christina in the Mediterranean to fly back to London, he said to her:  why do you bother to sing? I’ve got plenty of money.. (Robert Sutherland’s interview here)

Continue reading “sempre viva”

the human speaker

photo_web1[vimeo https://vimeo.com/29252444 w=560&h=340]

The Human Speaker collar by Nic Wallenberg is able to turn one’s mouth into a speaker.
It bypasses the vocal chords and transmits vibrations directly into the upper throat so wearers can play music by only moving their lips and mouth.
Each collar can produce up to two music notes at a time, so the more people using the collars together the more complex the compositions can become.
Via juxtapoz. Link to video.