Hank Butitta Bought a Bus

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As his master’s final project, architect Hank Butitta transformed a school bus into a mobile home, equiped with a kitchen, bathroom, beds, storage and flooring from reclaimed wood panels.

Find more and follow his travels at Hank Bought a Bus.

via ny daily news

some previous posts on mobile living:

De Markies by Eduard Böhtlingk

The travelling Academy of UnNatural Science

Del Popolo mobile pizzaria truck

Keg apartments from tanker tracks by Aristide Antonas

Opera house  by YSIN

Branch bed / Jan Kochanski

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Branch is a easy to set up suspended tent / bed by product designer Jan Kochański.

Branch doesn’t take a lot of space in your backpack. The user doesn’t have to take extra mattress because the suspension protects from moisture and cold. Setting up the tent takes few seconds. All you need to do is pick up the tree and put the rubber band around the trunk on high that you want to spend night on. The band tied on 225 cm from the ground (average range of hands) gives 50 cm from the bottom of the tent to the ground. After the band is tied up on the tree the base of the tent has to be prepared to suspend. All the construction parts are sew in the material so it’s easier to set it up. After the bed is done the tent has to be suspended on the band.

Previously: Backpack Beds by Tony & Lisa Clark

Shelters, Shacks and Shanties

Shelters, Shacks and Shanties

 

Check out Shelters, Shacks and Shanties, a Gutenberg free e-book, originally written and illustrated in 1920 by D.C. Beard.

It has 338 pen and ink drawings, along with instructions for a wide range of shelters, from the simplest and most basic — structures built with nothing but a hatchet — to gradually more elaborate constructions using an axe. It’s addressed to “boys of all ages” and is of special interest to homesteaders or anyone else thinking about putting a simple roof overhead.

 

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via no tech mag

A Period of Juvenile Prosperity / Mike Brodie

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Images of hitchhikers and train hoppers from the book A Period of Juvenile Prosperity by American photographer Mike Brodie.

The book is documentation of Mike Brodie‘s bohemian 4 years on road, living with his friends on train roofs or railroads banks and travelling around the US with nothing but a backpack.

 

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Buy the Period of Juvenile Prosperity book here

previously:  Car Poolers by  Alejandro Cartagena

De Markies / Eduard Böhtlingk

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Mobile home designed in 1985 by Dutch architect Eduard Böhtlingk.

De Markies (The Awning) trailer measures 2.00 m X 4.50 m on the road, but with a pair of awnings can triple its overall floor space, to offer pvt sleeping quarters, a living room with full location view and in the middle a kitchen with stove, sink, table, storage and bathroom.

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The project De Markies was awarded the Public Prize at the Rotterdam Design Prize 1996.

Photos by Roos Aldershoff

Check out the mobile Opera house here  or some vintage Rolling homes there